Grant Writing Guidelines in Creating Effective Proposals

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Proposal writing is certainly one pain in the neck. You can’t do it in just one sitting, certainly not like resumes or letters of requests. That’s why in order to master the art, you don’t just need to read the grant writing guidelines like this. It’s just as important that you look for exemplars. Before you conclude that you truly know the way to making a winning document, Allied Grant Writers recommends that you should go out and get your hands dirty in order to know which works and which doesn’t.

Grant Writing Guidelines to Follow

1. Seek help from those who already made winning proposals.

Find a copy that actually won the fund. If you don’t know where to find one, ask the organization to give you a copy of the winning paper. Some don’t give it, some do. The important thing is just to ask. Once you have it, read it twice and note the things you found exceptional about the piece.

2. Be realistic with the budget.

Allied Grant Writers believes that there’s no argument in matters of realistic figures. If you set a budget that is too impossible or too conservative, you will be eliminated. No questions asked on whether you really mean the figures. But most of the time, they’ll consider you as one of the delusional folks who don’t have a clue how much their dreams cost.

3. Shake hands and network.

Creating a grant that will win the fund is not just about saying the right words. It’s also about being the right person to say the words. How, you may ask – boost your credibility. Be a friend to the people who’ll read it and you’ll see how they trust you more when they know you, or when people know you. The more people you know and befriend (regardless of whether they can help you in your business or not), the more that you’re likely to be trusted with the fund.

4. Customize the proposal.

Design the proposal in such a way that it will target the exact organization or person who will give the fund. Never pass a generic letter that can address any funder. Align the document with their values, priorities, and ideas. Prove that you are the perfect fit for the endowment. Allied Grant Writers highly suggests that you do your research about the funder and apply it on your grant.

Most of all, express it the way you talk in person. You are meant to touch hearts, if not human interest.

For more grant writing guidelines feel free to explore our blogs page.

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