Writing a Proposal for a Project: Giving Emphasis to the Need

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Grant Proposal

In writing a proposal for a project, you have to stress out a strong need. If you can’t discuss a problem to resolve, you might fail to get funder’s approval.

Funders assess your request for funds. They do this to make sure that they choose and back up the most worthy project. They approve proposals that will bring positive impact to the community and recipients of the project. With vague project details, they will have a hard time understanding what your program wants to undertake. Moreover, they might even doubt your project and ask, “Why would they fund you?”

As such, giving weight and going into the project need sends a clear vision of what the proposal wants to achieve. This will illustrate a significant answer to a society or people’s problem. A need assessment is a leading light for funders to grasp your program’s purpose. It explains the problem and the need to resolve it, making your program viable.

Writing a Proposal for a Project That Highlights the Need

Here are tips in writing a proposal that adopts measurable and realistic project need:

1. Promote the community and the people you want to help.

Write a proposal that reaches out to the community’s weakness. This could be a project to help people in poverty, or to feed malnourished children. Whatever your program is, it is crucial to provide facts that will verify the need to implement your program. So, include data of poverty rate, number of underweight children, and many more.

2. Indicate the project’s value to both recipients and less-affected ones.

Some proposals overlook the project’s significance for the community or target people. For example, how can a proposal about an arcade shop promote the community? Funders will still give priority to such projects only if they see the importance of the program to those who do not have interest on arcade games. Create a project need that affects both the target demographics and those that are not. If this will produce more jobs and increase the community’s income, then funders might consider your request.

3. Show that your project is for long-term.

Funders do not consider projects that are only for a short period of time. They go for programs that will run for long time to benefit many. Since they give you free-monies, they want to see how you are going to nurture it. They fund you as a jumpstart to carry out a venture that last for many years. In this case, your project must show long-term alliances with the community and target recipients.

If you need help to highlight the need, you may turn to grant writing services. They have expert writers to do this tough job for you.

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